lonelysandwich:

America’s Funniest Robots

(Source: pierregrassou)

Under Stockman’s bill, “The Dog Ate My Tax Receipts Act,” taxpayers who do not provide documents requested by the IRS can claim one of the following reasons:

1.         The dog ate my tax receipts
2.         Convenient, unexplained, miscellaneous computer malfunction
3.         Traded documents for five terrorists
4.         Burned for warmth while lost in the Yukon
5.         Left on table in Hillary’s Book Room
6.         Received water damage in the trunk of Ted Kennedy’s car
7.         Forgot in gun case sold to Mexican drug lords
8.         Forced to recycle by municipal Green Czar
9.         Was short on toilet paper while camping
10.       At this point, what difference does it make?

Great article on the issue

“When an OIG special agent arrived at this employee’s work space to conduct an interview, the special agent witnessed the employee actively viewing pornography on his government-issued computer,” Allan Williams, deputy assistant inspector general for investigations at the EPA, told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. “Subsequently, the employee confessed to spending, on average, between two and six hours per day viewing pornography while at work,” he added. The employee’s identity has not yet been released pending an ongoing Justice Department investigation, but he is still on the government’s payroll earning about $120,000 per year.

Well isn’t that interesting timing…

"Being an expert isn’t telling other people what you know. It’s understanding what questions to ask, and flexibly applying your knowledge to the specific situation at hand. Being an expert means providing sensible, highly contextual direction."

215 allows FBI to get records relevant to an investigation. PCLOB: NSA program fails on “FBI”, “records,” “relevant” & “investigation.”
— Julian Sanchez (@normative) January 23, 2014

QuestionHey Matt, Was wondering what would be your favorite or most used writing techniques? If any? Thanks. Answer

mattfractionblog:

panic and crippling self doubt

Think of it this way. Let’s say the government suspects you are a terrorist and it has access to your Facebook account. If you’re an American citizen, it can’t do that currently (with certain exceptions)—but for the sake of argument. So all of your friends, that’s one hop. Your friends’ friends, whether you know them or not—two hops. Your friends’ friends’ friends, whoever they happen to be, are that third hop. That’s a massive group of people that the NSA apparently considers fair game.